Coming together like a big fat plan

Following on from my excellent cunning plan for aquiring free plants, I had a message from a friend saying he was having a bit of a border sort out and would I like some of the stuff he was getting rid of? The word ‘yes’ came out faster than an angry wasp, and this weekend found me paying a visit and loading my plant booty into the back of my car.

Whilst there I noticed his hostas in tubs were actually the biggest specimins I have ever seen. Massive tubs, with lush foilage tumbling out of them – they were an absolute picture (and slightly impressively, he knew all their proper names too). These beauties were a tad different from my own patio pot, and I needed to know how on earth he’d achieved this. Back came the simple answer:

“I feed them.”

“With what though? Rocket Juice?? I need the secret formula!” I replied.

He then went on to show me the snacks of choice, and his method was simple. If you want lush, green foilage, feed with nitrogen-rich plant food; for flowers and fruit, feed with potassium-rich. The stuff he was using wasn’t even top of the range expensive food either. So simple, and yet so effective.

I vowed to pick up some plant food when next in town, and whizzed home to rehome my haul. He’d gifted me some clumps of Agapantha; one of my favourites which will look splendid at the entrance to the garden, and a plant that will produce big daisy-like flowers. In addition came a bag of Rudbekia seeds.

Looking around the garden, I have to say, it’s gone a bit bonkers. The wild flower seeds sown at the beginning of the season have blossomed into a riot of colour, so much so that I’m struggling to see the soil now. These include cornflowers, assorted poppies, and some mystery guests that I don’t know their name. But it doesn’t matter – they look spectacular, and every day holds a new surprise. One of my favourites absolutely has to be the humble poppy. From a droopy bud on a tender stalk one day, it appears to straighten out and pop its pod overnight, revealing the most vivid, satin petals against a stamen centre. As they unfurl, I can almost hear them shout ‘Ta Daaa!’.  When the flowers fade, I’ll save the seeds and packet them up to share with friends, so we can all enjoy a touch of nature next year.

And of course, in addition to the gorgeous display, the garden is absolutely buzzing with wildlife activity – different varieties of bees, hoverflies and ladybirds, and we even have a family of wolf spiders who appear in a line and bask at the side of the patio.

From an empty patch of soil and a patchy bit of grass, I allowed myself a small, smug pat on the back, as it’s all coming together like a big, fat plan.

Wildlife garden is blooming lovely

Wildlife garden is blooming lovely

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